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Discover! Ever wonder how Washington wheat feeds the world?

As an internationally-renowned marine terminal and home to some of the most efficient grain export facilities on the west coast, the Port of Kalama plays a key role in how Washington wheat feeds the world!

Temco LLC—a grain terminal at the Port of Kalama—stores and handles grains like corn, soybeans and wheat for export from the Pacific Northwest to ports around the world. Today, 50 million tons of cargo travel up and down the Columbia River.

The Port’s location on the Columbia River helps us transport the hot commodity of wheat throughout the world. The Columbia River is the third largest grain export gateway in the world, exporting more than 50% of the nation’s wheat.

At the Port of Kalama, the Temco terminal handles up to 250 million bushels of grain per year and employs 120 local workers loading as much as 2 million bushels of grain every 24 hours.

Together, Port of Kalama companies and facilities employ 1,024 individuals, reported nearly $10 million in marine terminal operating revenues and accounted for nearly 14 million tons of grain exports in 2017.

We’re a part of a robust circle of life and transport for Washington wheat and other grain products. And we could not be more proud of our role.

Ever wonder how Washington wheat feeds the world? Check out its incredible journey here!

 

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Discover! Did you know that the Port of Kalama is part of the Pacific Northwest Waterways Association?

 The Port of Kalama works with the other Lower Columbia River Ports as a member of the Pacific Northwest Waterways Association (PNWA)—a non-profit trade association that helps ensure our waterways are efficient, reliable, and environmentally sustainable.

PNWA members include ports, businesses, public agencies and individuals who combine their economic and political strength in support of navigation, energy, trade and economic development throughout the Pacific Northwest.

To put the Port of Kalama’s place in the Pacific Northwest in perspective, the Columbia Snake River System is the nation’s number one wheat export gateway and number two soybean export gateway which is fed by a 365-mile, 14-foot draft inland barge system which stretches from Portland, OR to Lewiston, ID. The river system exported over 50 million tons of cargo in 2016. It is also the west coast’s number one wood and mineral bulks export gateway and a rising importer/exporter of vehicles. In all, over $21 billion worth of cargo moves on the Columbia Snake River System each year.

As a part of the Columbia Snake River System, the Port of Kalama is a strong advocate of the PNWA and their work to support the region on critical economic, environmental and transportation programs and issues.

The PNWA mission: PNWA strengthens the regional economy by increasing economic and environmental sustainability, while providing a cooperative, regional approach to addressing public policy. The organization monitors and advocates on issues impacting:

Environment

PNWA members work to protect the environment while preserving the economic value of the region’s water resources.

Energy & Salmon

PNWA works to maximize hydropower production and navigation systems on the Columbia and Snake rivers, while balancing the needs of salmon and working in support of ecosystem restoration and development.

Building Relationships

PNWA works with federal agencies, the Northwest Congressional delegation and stakeholders from around the region to build consensus and develop collaborative solutions for some of the most challenging Northwest issues.

Just some of the reasons the Port of Kalama is a committed member and participant in the PNWA:

  • PNWA was founded as the Inland Empire Waterways Association (IEWA) to provide water to grow food for a hungry nation, electrify the rural Northwest and provide a low-cost navigation channel to world markets
  • PNWA chaired the Management Committee completing the Lower Columbia River Estuary Program water quality management plan
  • PNWA works to protect the environment while preserving the economic value of resources affected by regional development

 

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Wishing you a safe and happy Independence Day!

Happy Independence Day!

Here is some information about Port facilities and some tips for Holiday safety at the Port:

  • The Port office will be closed. Calls to the office will be routed to voice mail.
  • If you observe fire or other emergency CALL 911!
  • Louis Rasmussen and Marine Parks (near McMenamins)
  • Fireworks are not allowed within the parks on the grass or landscaping.
  • Please contain fireworks on the beach in the sand.
  • Haydu Park will be open during the day, but it will be closed in the evening. Fireworks are not allowed at Haydu Park.
  • North Port: NO FIREWORKS at the North Port.
  • Tradewinds Road will be blocked to vehicle traffic where the gravel begins. You may still walk to the river in this area.

 

Please encourage safety and courtesy to others and use the extra dumpsters we have provided for trash.

The Sheriff, Kalama Police, and Port security will be patrolling the area.

Please call our office through 5pm on July 3 with questions! 360 673-2325

Have a happy holiday celebration!

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Discover! Did you know the Port of Kalama is part of a hundred year old network of Washington Ports?

As settlers migrated across the country, they often chose locations near water. Washington State was no different – with many deep harbors and navigable rivers, towns sprung up throughout the state, dependent on access to water for movement of goods and people.

In 1889, the new state constitution declared that these beds of navigable waters belonged to the people, and gave the Legislature power to designate which of those beds would become harbors. In 1911, after citizens lobbied for the right to control access to the waterfront, the Legislature passed the Port District Act, allowing the people to form a port district and elect commissioners to govern it.

In September of 1911, the Port of Seattle was formed, becoming the first autonomous municipal corporation in the nation to engage in port terminal operation and commerce development. The Port of Grays Harbor was formed shortly thereafter. Since then, more than 80 port districts have formed in Washington, all contributing to the state’s healthy trade economy.

Port of Kalama also enjoys a rich history that weaves through time along waterways, railways and roadways to drive home why transportation continues to be the community’s mainstay today. The Columbia River attracted a steady stream of settlers like namesake Hawaiian John Kalama who arrived in Kalama in 1837 to act as a middleman between local Cowlitz Tribe and the Hudson Bay Company. In 1870, the Irish and Chinese arrived to work on the railroad. The Scandinavians with interests in fishing and logging settled in Kalama as well.

On Monday, December 22, 1919, a group of Kalama residents met at the Kalama Business Men’s Club to discuss the formation of a port district. By May, 1920, the Port of Kalama was born of a local election process. We’ll be honoring 100 years of service to the community during a Centennial Celebration next year!

Today highway, rail and water meet in Kalama at some of the most efficient transportation networks in the country. Kalama’s particular landscape gave birth to a booming transportation system impacting the area both culturally and economically—ultimately transforming the area into its position today as an internationally-connected community.

Currently, there are 75 public port districts in Washington. Large and small, east and west, Washington’s ports are active in many different areas of economic development, providing jobs and economic stimulation for their communities.

Thank you to the Washington Public Ports Association for some of this educational content.

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Port of Kalama appoints Marine Terminal Administrator

Former Portland Police Officer, Randy Teig, hired as Facility Security Officer to manage Port marine terminals and security systems

 

Port of Kalama has appointed former Portland Police Officer, Randy Teig, as Marine Terminal Administrator effective June 1, 2019. Teig, who brings 31 years of experience in public law enforcement, will act as Facility Security Officer (FSO) at the Port and be responsible for managing marine terminals and security systems.

Teig is a Kelso native who most recently worked at the City of Gresham Development Division after retiring from the Portland Police Force in 2018. He is married with four adult children and is a local business owner in Kelso.

“We are thrilled to welcome a law enforcement officer with the experience of Randy Teig—and he’s a local Cowlitz County native!” says Alan Basso, president, Port of Kalama Board of Commissioners. “Randy will assume the important position of Facility Security Officer to administer the security system. Please join us in welcoming this tremendous human resource to the Port.”

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Discover! What’s on tap for your summer entertainment at the Port of Kalama?

Summer is on the way and so are seasonal events hosted at the Port of Kalama! It is part of the Port of Kalama mission to create recreational opportunities for the community and with the opening of the new Westin Amphitheater, there are even more summer events perfect for entertaining the whole family!

Mark your calendars for some new festivities and some annual traditions. Coming soon:

McMenamins Summer Concert Series at the new Westin Amphitheater, Wednesday nights from 6—8:15p—all summer long.

Kalama Heritage Festival—sharing the spirit of Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest—at Marine and Rasmussen Parks, June 28, 29, 30

McMenamins Movies in the Park, to be scheduled soon!

Kalama Fair at Haydu Park, July 11—13

Steelhead Challenge Derby, Rasmussen Park, July 19, 20, 21

ASC Dog Show, Marine Park, July 26, 27, 28

McMenamins Inaugural Brewfest, Marine Park & Westin Amphitheater, August 10

 

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Discover! Did you know the Port of Kalama dedicates new amphitheater to longest serving Port commissioner Milford S. Westin?

The Westin Amphitheater at Marine Park will be dedicated at a brief ceremony on June 5th at 6:30 p.m. prior to the first McMenamins Concert in the Park

 

Port of Kalama will dedicate its new amphitheater to the longest acting Port commissioner Milford S. Westin, who served the community for 28 years from 1977 to 2005. The Port honors Westin for his tireless public service, commitment to parks and recreational amenities, and a notable legacy of long-term planning that has made the Port the global economic engine for the community it is today. The brief dedication ceremony will take place on Wednesday, June 5 at 5:45 p.m.

When Westin joined the Port as commissioner, the organization consisted of a grain elevator and a couple of lumber companies, a budget of $295,000 and two employees. Construction of the Port’s marina was just beginning. Because of some of the strategic long-term planning of Westin and other commissioners, the Port of Kalama is now home to more than 30 industries employing well over 1,200 workers.

The Port of Kalama has long considered the community benefits of creating a small public amphitheater on the Kalama waterfront to accommodate a growing number of events, concerts and public activities. With a mission of providing recreational assets to the community, the Port has completed construction of the long-awaited amphitheater.

“It is only fitting to dedicate this exceptional new community asset to Milford Westin who made innumerable contributions to the Port’s many successes and developments,” said Alan Basso, president, Port of Kalama Board of Commissioners. “It is the careful planning and strategic direction of our predecessors like Westin that enable us to envision public recreational features like the new Westin Amphitheater—we are grateful for his many contributions.”

McMenamins hosts the first in a series of summer concerts with The Ferenjis from 7:00—8:15 p.m. The concert series runs every Wednesday night through the summer. For a complete list of concerts click here.

“Part of the Port’s mission is to create recreational opportunities for the community—these improvements and the addition of a small outdoor venue for public events fulfill that goal,” says Basso. “With increased use of Port parks, the intent is to create more diverse and enjoyable guest experiences at events like the ones the region has been enjoying for decades such as the Blues and Hawaiian Festivals among others.”

 

Milford S. Westin pictured here below:

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Call out to local vendors! Port of Kalama invites local artists, businesses, crafters and gardeners/farmers to showcase their products at the first-ever Community Market

The Port will host a Wednesday Night Community Market to support local entrepreneurs and artists during McMenamins Summer Concert Series

 

Port of Kalama is seeking local vendors to participate in its first-ever ‘Wednesday Community Market’ to offer local artisans, gardeners and crafters free space to showcase their locally-produced goods and arts. The innovative pop-up market will be open during the McMenamins Summer Concert Series on Wednesday nights from 6—10 p.m. in Marine Park.

Anyone in Kalama’s 98625 zip-code is welcome to apply for a booth to participate in this first ever local farmers’ and artisan market. Applications are available online here.

Details for booth application

Local applications must be received no later than one week before the scheduled event–though if vendors are interested in reserving a booth now for next week’s June 5th concert, they will be accepted.  Applications are available here. Vendor spaces for the Wednesday Community Market are available for local Kalama (98625) artists, gardeners, crafters, and others wishing to sell their products. While no prepared food or drink that interfere with concert event sponsors will be allowed, local fresh produce is welcome.

Booths must be open and staffed from 6—10 p.m. and set up can begin at 4 p.m. Items that promote political or religious messages are not allowed to be sold or distributed. Any loud or disrupting items or displays that may interfere with the concert or are considered hazardous will not be allowed.

Inspiration to support local artisans

The Port of Kalama’s Wednesday Community Market was inspired by a recent visit to Kalama sponsored by the Cowlitz County Economic Development Commission. Becky McCray, a rural and small town business expert, inspired local government and businesses with ideas to further engage small businesses to enhance community health and livability.

Port of Kalama is seeking to spur local entrepreneurialism with the market that is simple and inexpensive to try.  The hope is to grow small businesses for Kalama.

“We believe that the time is right for a community market here in Kalama—and there’s no better time to launch than our first concert series at the new amphitheater,” says Alan Basso, President of the Port of Kalama Commission. “We’ve got a ready-made audience and space for small businesses to engage local consumers—and we hope that this is a productive way for the Port to further support the business community and local producers.”

The first-ever Wednesday Community Market debuts next Wednesday, June 5, at the first McMenamins Summer Concert Series.

For more information, contact the Port of Kalama at 360-673-2325.

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Discover! Did you know that the Port of Kalama is part of the largest public port system in the world?

Washington state has the largest locally-controlled public port system in the world with 75 port districts. Washington represents 2% of the U.S. population, and Washington ports handle 7% of U.S. exports and 6% of all imports.

Those ports are located in 33 of the 39 counties in Washington—and the Port of Kalama is one of them!

If you live in Washington, chances are that most of what you eat, wear and use came through one of Washington’s 75 ports. Our state is the most trade-dependent in the nation, with trade responsible for one in every four jobs in Washington.

Washington’s 75 ports range in size from accommodating international deep-draft trade to small community marinas and recreational boat launches and rail operators. Ports also operate docks, airports, railroads, industrial sites, marinas and recreational facilities throughout the state, bringing investments and jobs to their communities.

The Washington Public Ports Association promotes the interests of these ports and Washington state citizens to contribute to our state’s economy and quality of life through effective government relations, ongoing education, and strong advocacy programs.

Currently, 69 ports are members of the Washington Public Ports Association, visible below within the map.  Notice something? Not all ports are located on waterways—and they don’t need to be! Many airports and railways are port districts.

The primary purpose of a port district in Washington State is economic development—port districts can build and operate airports, marine terminals, marinas, railroads, and industrial parks, and in some cases, promote tourism.

Special thanks to the Washington Public Ports Association for aggregating this information to offer insight into the largest public port system in the world. The Port of Kalama is a proud, active member of the association. Check it out for more information on the work of our public ports system.

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Port of Kalama Manufacturing and Marine Export Facility

Today, Governor Inslee made an announcement pertaining to the proposed Kalama Methanol Manufacturing and Marine Export Facility project.  As stated in the Governor’s press release, this does not change the state regulatory process, currently underway. The Port and County will continue to complete the supplemental environmental review, with the Final Supplemental EIS expected to be completed late this summer.

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