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Category Archives: Discover! Port of Kalama

Discover! Does the Port levy taxes?

No taxes! Decades of strategic planning by past port commissioners continues to ensure the required revenue to maintain port facilities, parks and services for all residents with no taxes added. Every year the Port of Kalama commission is required

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Discover! Port of Kalama named third largest bulk exporter on the West Coast, 16th largest in the nation

According to the US Census Bureau and USA Trade Online, the Port of Kalama  is  the third largest bulk exporter on the West Coast right after Los Angeles and Long Beach, California. Handling well over 13 million tons  of bulk commodities, the Port of Kalama weighs in as one of the nation’s largest tonnage export facilities shipping more bulk cargo than even its neighbors Portland, Longview and Seattle.

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Discover! Summer is still in full-swing at the Port of Kalama!

The way we see it, summer is still in full-swing until we welcome Fall on September 21st and so are seasonal events hosted at the Port of Kalama! It is all part of the Port of Kalama mission to create recreational opportunities for the community—and there are still summer events perfect for entertaining the whole family.

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Discover! Ever wonder how Washington wheat feeds the world?

As an internationally-renowned marine terminal and home to some of the most efficient grain export facilities on the west coast, the Port of Kalama plays a key role in how Washington wheat feeds the world!

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Discover! Did you know that the Port of Kalama is part of the Pacific Northwest Waterways Association?

 The Port of Kalama works with the other Lower Columbia River Ports as a member of the Pacific Northwest Waterways Association (PNWA)—a non-profit trade association that helps ensure our waterways are efficient, reliable, and environmentally sustainable.

PNWA members include ports, businesses, public agencies and individuals who combine their economic and political strength in support of navigation, energy, trade and economic development throughout the Pacific Northwest.

To put the Port of Kalama’s place in the Pacific Northwest in perspective, the Columbia Snake River System is the nation’s number one wheat export gateway and number two soybean export gateway which is fed by a 365-mile, 14-foot draft inland barge system which stretches from Portland, OR to Lewiston, ID. The river system exported over 50 million tons of cargo in 2016. It is also the west coast’s number one wood and mineral bulks export gateway and a rising importer/exporter of vehicles. In all, over $21 billion worth of cargo moves on the Columbia Snake River System each year.

As a part of the Columbia Snake River System, the Port of Kalama is a strong advocate of the PNWA and their work to support the region on critical economic, environmental and transportation programs and issues.

The PNWA mission: PNWA strengthens the regional economy by increasing economic and environmental sustainability, while providing a cooperative, regional approach to addressing public policy. The organization monitors and advocates on issues impacting:

Environment

PNWA members work to protect the environment while preserving the economic value of the region’s water resources.

Energy & Salmon

PNWA works to maximize hydropower production and navigation systems on the Columbia and Snake rivers, while balancing the needs of salmon and working in support of ecosystem restoration and development.

Building Relationships

PNWA works with federal agencies, the Northwest Congressional delegation and stakeholders from around the region to build consensus and develop collaborative solutions for some of the most challenging Northwest issues.

Just some of the reasons the Port of Kalama is a committed member and participant in the PNWA:

  • PNWA was founded as the Inland Empire Waterways Association (IEWA) to provide water to grow food for a hungry nation, electrify the rural Northwest and provide a low-cost navigation channel to world markets
  • PNWA chaired the Management Committee completing the Lower Columbia River Estuary Program water quality management plan
  • PNWA works to protect the environment while preserving the economic value of resources affected by regional development

 

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Discover! Did you know the Port of Kalama is part of a hundred year old network of Washington Ports?

As settlers migrated across the country, they often chose locations near water. Washington State was no different – with many deep harbors and navigable rivers, towns sprung up throughout the state, dependent on access to water for movement of goods and people.

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Discover! What’s on tap for your summer entertainment at the Port of Kalama?

Summer is on the way and so are seasonal events hosted at the Port of Kalama! It is part of the Port of Kalama mission to create recreational opportunities for the community and with the opening of the new Westin Amphitheater, there are even more summer events perfect for entertaining the whole family!

Mark your calendars for some new festivities and some annual traditions. Coming soon:

McMenamins Summer Concert Series at the new Westin Amphitheater, Wednesday nights from 6—8:15p—all summer long.

Kalama Heritage Festival—sharing the spirit of Hawaii and the Pacific Northwest—at Marine and Rasmussen Parks, June 28, 29, 30

McMenamins Movies in the Park, to be scheduled soon!

Kalama Fair at Haydu Park, July 11—13

Steelhead Challenge Derby, Rasmussen Park, July 19, 20, 21

ASC Dog Show, Marine Park, July 26, 27, 28

McMenamins Inaugural Brewfest, Marine Park & Westin Amphitheater, August 10

 

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Discover! Did you know the Port of Kalama dedicates new amphitheater to longest serving Port commissioner Milford S. Westin?

The Westin Amphitheater at Marine Park will be dedicated at a brief ceremony on June 5th at 6:30 p.m. prior to the first McMenamins Concert in the Park

 

Port of Kalama will dedicate its new amphitheater to the longest acting Port commissioner Milford S. Westin, who served the community for 28 years from 1977 to 2005. The Port honors Westin for his tireless public service, commitment to parks and recreational amenities, and a notable legacy of long-term planning that has made the Port the global economic engine for the community it is today. The brief dedication ceremony will take place on Wednesday, June 5 at 5:45 p.m.

When Westin joined the Port as commissioner, the organization consisted of a grain elevator and a couple of lumber companies, a budget of $295,000 and two employees. Construction of the Port’s marina was just beginning. Because of some of the strategic long-term planning of Westin and other commissioners, the Port of Kalama is now home to more than 30 industries employing well over 1,200 workers.

The Port of Kalama has long considered the community benefits of creating a small public amphitheater on the Kalama waterfront to accommodate a growing number of events, concerts and public activities. With a mission of providing recreational assets to the community, the Port has completed construction of the long-awaited amphitheater.

“It is only fitting to dedicate this exceptional new community asset to Milford Westin who made innumerable contributions to the Port’s many successes and developments,” said Alan Basso, president, Port of Kalama Board of Commissioners. “It is the careful planning and strategic direction of our predecessors like Westin that enable us to envision public recreational features like the new Westin Amphitheater—we are grateful for his many contributions.”

McMenamins hosts the first in a series of summer concerts with The Ferenjis from 7:00—8:15 p.m. The concert series runs every Wednesday night through the summer. For a complete list of concerts click here.

“Part of the Port’s mission is to create recreational opportunities for the community—these improvements and the addition of a small outdoor venue for public events fulfill that goal,” says Basso. “With increased use of Port parks, the intent is to create more diverse and enjoyable guest experiences at events like the ones the region has been enjoying for decades such as the Blues and Hawaiian Festivals among others.”

 

Milford S. Westin pictured here below:

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Discover! Did you know that the Port of Kalama is part of the largest public port system in the world?

Washington state has the largest locally-controlled public port system in the world with 75 port districts. Washington represents 2% of the U.S. population, and Washington ports handle 7% of U.S. exports and 6% of all imports.

Those ports are located in 33 of the 39 counties in Washington—and the Port of Kalama is one of them!

If you live in Washington, chances are that most of what you eat, wear and use came through one of Washington’s 75 ports. Our state is the most trade-dependent in the nation, with trade responsible for one in every four jobs in Washington.

Washington’s 75 ports range in size from accommodating international deep-draft trade to small community marinas and recreational boat launches and rail operators. Ports also operate docks, airports, railroads, industrial sites, marinas and recreational facilities throughout the state, bringing investments and jobs to their communities.

The Washington Public Ports Association promotes the interests of these ports and Washington state citizens to contribute to our state’s economy and quality of life through effective government relations, ongoing education, and strong advocacy programs.

Currently, 69 ports are members of the Washington Public Ports Association, visible below within the map.  Notice something? Not all ports are located on waterways—and they don’t need to be! Many airports and railways are port districts.

The primary purpose of a port district in Washington State is economic development—port districts can build and operate airports, marine terminals, marinas, railroads, and industrial parks, and in some cases, promote tourism.

Special thanks to the Washington Public Ports Association for aggregating this information to offer insight into the largest public port system in the world. The Port of Kalama is a proud, active member of the association. Check it out for more information on the work of our public ports system.

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Discover! A remarkable team leads the Port of Kalama’s award-winning dredge maintenance program

Port dredge maintenance professionals encourage young people to check out environmental engineering and science careers

 

After participating this week in another successful and productive Career Fair at Kalama High School, the Port of Kalama continues to educate the community—and in particular local youth—about career and job opportunities.

Meet a remarkable team of women who have dedicated their work—in part—to the Port’s year-round dredge maintenance program effort. The work of these engineers and environmental scientists help keep the Port’s berths and maritime business moving smoothly—all while ensuring environmental health as well as riverfront park and beach nourishment for recreational enjoyment.

Tabitha Reeder is the Port of Kalama’s environmental manager with a degree in biology and a masters in environmental science who leads the permitting process for Port projects. She also helps manage a talented team of engineers and environmental scientists on the Port’s award-winning annual maintenance dredging program.

With a location right on the Columbia River, the Port manages a number of deep-water berths to serve ocean going shipping vessels—in addition to a community marina.  The TEMCO berth requires annual dredging to remove accumulated material. Federal and state agencies prefer to keep the sand in the natural ecosystem of the river to maintain a healthy habitat. The removed sediment and soil are placed in environmentally-friendly locations whether riverfront beaches, deep water, or to stabilize pilings in the river.

It takes a complex suite of skills and knowledge required to keep those channels clear and dredging and placement environmentally sound. The Port is required to coordinate with numerous local, state and federal agencies for permitting on all elements of these operations.

Reeder works with Eric Yakovich, economic development manager at the Port to manage and direct the work of Jessica Côté, coastal engineer, Amber Roesler, senior environmental scientist at Berger ABAM and Sally Fisher, a senior project manager with a background in soil science and natural resources management at Berger ABAM. This ‘dream team’ provides pivotal counsel for the Port to keep maritime operations running smoothly—and within environmental guidelines.

The lead engineer and designer on all of the Port’s dredge maintenance projects is Jessica Côté, a professional engineer (PE) with a Masters in ocean engineering, who has dedicated her career to integrating physical sciences with engineering to solve complex coastal and ocean problems around the world. She builds and leads multi-disciplinary teams to evaluate project feasibility and design guidelines for small and large coastal development and infrastructure, shoreline stabilization, dredging, and marine transportation like that at the Port of Kalama.

Côté has always loved the great outdoors and spending time around water.  As a student she was specifically intrigued with how water works and moves. She excelled in math and science in high school and chose a career that enabled her to solve problems associated with water movement and flow on shorelines. After living on an island doing marine ecology work and learning to scuba dive, she started her engineering work and recently launched a private consulting firm working as a coastal engineer for clients like the Port of Kalama.

“The Port is extremely forward-thinking and proactive on how they manage their dredging and placement program—they are required to have a maintenance dredge program where they maintain water depths in the river where ships are coming in and out of berths and they take it to the next level. The Columbia River is tidally influenced and has a lot of sediment moving around in the river so as a coastal engineer I deal with the complex interactions between the water movement and that sediment,” says Cote. “We use survey information to determine the depths and then design dredging and how much material we need to move and place to accommodate the robust shipping industry at the Port.”

Côté says the opportunities for graduates in this line of work are wide open and she encourages people interested in this career line to dig deeper into math and sciences. She also encourages students to build a network, ask questions and seek out help and direction whenever they need it in order to keep learning.

Amber Roesler and Sally Fisher work together to coordinate with regulatory agencies on behalf of the Port of Kalama’s dredge maintenance program. They also applaud the Port’s progressive dredge maintenance program—and their keen oversight of dredging and placing materials intentionally to ensure healthy environmental habitats and recreational beaches.

The BergerABAM team provides the studies necessary to secure permits for evaluating dredged sediment quality and suitability. The team samples sediment for soil contamination and determines whether the quality of the soil is clean to place on the Port’s beaches.

“We help the Port of Kalama manage the dredging and soil or sediment disposal program in terms of selecting and permitting suitable places in the river or along the beaches where we can place the dredged material,” says Fisher. “That whole idea of best places to relocate sediment won the Western Dredging Association 2016 award for excellence—which was a very cool honor for the Port and this whole team. Working with coastal engineer Jessica Côté’s designs for best soil placement, we recommended placing dredge materials behind dike pilings in the river to support them and keep the river flowing without obstruction. There is so much satisfaction knowing you are helping your client maintain healthy rivers.”

Roesler says she has always been intrigued with how things work in the natural world—especially on a smaller scale and at the microscopic level so she started taking geology and botany courses to learn more. It was that interest as a young student that led her to studies in science and using math and science to solve problems.

Similarly, Fisher was always interested in subjects like water resources, biology, science and natural resources. They both recommend that students ‘take the darn math!’ It’s math that is everywhere and the building blocks of all sciences. They say stick with the sciences as there are so many jobs available to those who do. The team acknowledges that kids nearing graduation are nervous and overwhelmed but that a whole wide world of opportunities opens up to them if they follow an interest in science, technology and math.

“What we want everyone to know is how the Port makes decisions when it comes to the environment, healthy habitats and the river—the Port is heavily regulated and is required to work within numerous complex local, state, and federal laws and regulations,” says Mark Wilson, executive director at Port of Kalama. “It is the Port’s incredible team of engineers and scientists and their knowledge, creativity and relationship with the agencies, that enable us to offer win-win innovations to the community.”

Wilson adds that the Port is committed to creating a balanced opportunity for students to learn about a range of careers and business opportunities—there are amazing jobs right here and businesses that offer exceptional opportunities in Kalama.

 

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