The Port of Kalama has approved  a resolution to fully support dams in the Federal Columbia-Snake River System. The resolution will be submitted to the Washington State Legislature.  The Port of Kalama supports the continued operation of the dams within the Federal Columbia-Snake River System due to their importance to irrigation; flood control; recreation; fuel-efficient, safe, low-emission cargo transportation;  and the reliability of the Northwest electric grid which provides carbon-free, renewable, reliable, and low-cost energy making them an important component of a clean energy future.

Citing the need for a strong working river system throughout the Pacific Northwest, the Port commission strongly supports the dams stating:

The dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers provide navigable waters to sustain the region’s marine-dependent economy, irrigation, flood control and recreation for the residents of Washington state and the Pacific Northwest.

The Port of Kalama handles cargo shipped on the Federal Columbia-Snake River System and exports that cargo globally.

The Lower Snake River Dams enable irrigation for over 7 million acres of farmland producing $8 billion in agricultural income; and

The Lower Snake River Dams enabled barging of approximately 9 million tons of cargo in 2014 valued at over $3 billion.

The Federal Columbia-Snake River System is the top wheat export gateway in the U.S. handling over half of the country’s exported wheat from 11 U.S. states, is the second most important export system in the U.S. for corn and soybeans, and is the west coast’s largest export system for wood products and minerals.

In addition, the Lower Snake River Dams are some of the least expensive to operate and, with the cost of power generated by the dams ranging from $10 to $14 per megawatt-hour, provide some of the greatest value for BPA customers; and

Based on studies and BiOps carried out by NOAA Fisheries, the Commission endorses the position that hydroelectric dams and salmon can coexist.

Given that the CRSO EIS process is well-underway and expected to be concluded in 2020, the Commission believes the $750,000 allocated to study the impacts of the removal of the Lower Snake River Dams to be duplicative and should have been allocated to science-based, high-priority salmon restoration projects, increased hatchery production and law enforcement activities in the Puget Sound region that will have a direct impact on Orca survival in their primary habitat.

For more information: https://www.snakeriverfaces.com/facts

And check out this informational video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ku2bdXHxsZk

 

Kalama Snake River dam resolution Port of Kalama Resolution 1099